I am all about black and white right now. Give me a tuxedo jacket any day, any time of the year.


It’s so simple and so easy.

I get regular promotional emails from lagarconne.com. While most of their clothing is out of my price range, I love the editorials and the ideas. There are several online retailers doing this now, some even doing video. The most famous of these, of course, is net-a-porter.com with their weekly “magazine” editorials. They have the size and pull–one of the first online stores to sell big luxury designers–to commission videos with people like Stella McCartney and such.

I get just as much fashion ideas from these as any magazine or blog. A friend of mine who works in marketing told me about five years ago that “story is everything now”. If you have a brand or a store, any kind of business, really, I’m sure you’ve noticed this increase of storyhood. People just don’t enjoy buying something without a sense of story, authenticity or personality behind something.

Gone are the modernist “buy from us because you can trust us and we look professional” sense of things, although yes, there are still older generations who want to invest that way. The problem is, Sears isn’t your neighborhood-friendly store anymore–to my generation, it’s a conglomerate blob.

We want stories, and that’s why so many companies have blogs now. It’s untenable to think otherwise–you have to appear personable, with a background.

So, did I get off track there? Yes, I did. I was thinking about how much I love looking at online stores now because they have stories like this. This week’s La Garconne’s editorial is simple. Black and White, but they call it “Chemise” which I guess is about a simple white shirt floating over standard black skinny jeans.

If you flip through it, you’ll notice the piece called Rachel Comey’s “Second Husband Coat”. Now what the brouhaha is up with that? Firstly, it’s hard to take this seriously on the shoulders of a (seriously, no older than) 16-year-old model. (I love fashion, but it loses on context about 90% of the time.)

Listen, ladies, boyfriend jeans and coats were one thing, but now the whole I’m-really-ambivalent-if-not-angry-at-men-but-proud-to-be-owning-some-liberty-with-his-clothing-thing is kind of getting out of hand. Like: well, we can’t keep them, or trust them, but we can “own” their clothing. I think it all just screams feminine desperation. I want to make a suit that says the “I Love My Husband Suit”. Or, because, my husband actually has a NAME, I might put that on there, too. He is not a “DH”, he is not “The Husband” or “Formerly Boyfriend Then Husband”. He is Derek. He rocks, he really does.

I know I’m not the only one who feels this way: Boyfriend Trousers? I want Jewess Jeans.

And what are Jewess Jeans? So glad you asked. First, do you remember Gloria Vanderbilt? Yeah, I was a child of the 80s.

But oh boy, how many rabbit trails was that?